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that this u.s. launches these drone attacks against al qaeda targets from that particular base. i want to bring in two folks here at the pentagon chris lawrence also michael holmes from cnn international. chris, it's not a total surprise that this was there in saudi arabia, but certainly it was not something that they officially wanted to reveal. why are they doing it now? >> that's the big question, suzanne, why did this come out? we reported two years ago from our sources u.s. officials were telling us the cia was building an airstrip in the a arabian peninsula. it was hinted it would possibly be in saudi arabia. but we never had any sort of agreement to withhold that. we simply reported it was being built in the arabian peninsula. others entered an agreement with the white house to hold back the exact location. why that is coming out now? that's what we are trying to figure out. it's certainly extremely provocative. you couldn't pick probably a more provocative place in the islamic world to have u.s. strikes originating from saudi arabia. it is for that reason u.s. troops on saudi s
at sigtarp and was also at the u.s. securities and exchange commission who -- and served as counsel to mary schapiro and christopher cox. and investigative financial fraud, insider trading and other violations of securities law. she spent time as a litigator. her jd is from brigham young law school and she went to school here, old dominion university. the special inspector general from tarp and a recent report. treasury continues approving excessive -- excessive pay. on twitter -- is this all hindsight? guest: it is interesting. one of the things we constantly report on is things that should have been done better. you have to respect that a lot of decisions were made with a sense of urgency. but the compensation decisions were not. there was plenty of time to set up a good system for that. and even for the discount -- for the decisions that were made in a rush, it is really important we point out how things could have been done better. let's say we get and the situation where there is another crisis. and treasury and the regulators are running around with a sense of courtesy in an emergency
point to a different reality. economic mobility in the u.s. is low compared to what it was in times past and with current levels in many european countries in canada. you hear all about rags to riches stories, but they are the exceptions. a comprehensive study by the pew economic mobility documents that in the u.s. today few poor people become even upper middle class. now, some of the criticism of president obama's program has come from people who worry about the government's track record in the area of early childhood education. they point to head start, the long-standing program that provides this education to disadvantaged children. the department of health and human services released a study of head start in 2010 which was updated in 2012 that positive effects begin to fade in a few years. this has led many to call the program a failure and urged the government not to throw good money after bad. people are jumping to conclusions about a very complicated subject without understanding the study or social science research. three scholars from the university of chicago and university of
. meanwhile on tuesday, pakistan's ambassador to the u.s. discussed the issue of drone attacks saying strikes are indirect violation of international law and her events came at an event hosted by the "christian science monitor." >> i want to ask you about the drones. pakistan's position is that the drone strikes are a violation of your sovreignty and international law and i think under both of those guidelines you have the right to self-defense. and further, just to guide your answer, has pakistan threatened to shoot down drones, and if not, why not? the reason i ask this is because there is an understanding that while pakistan publicly opposes the strike, privately it sort of winks. >> let me address this as most people do to speak to what they can in terms of the question put and it's an important question and you do ask -- you ask a question which many ask, is there a quiet come policity in this. let me assure you, there is no question of quiet come policity or wink and nod. this is a parliamentary red line all government institutions have internalized as policy. and you know, i say this a
the circumstances in which such force is directed against u.s. citizens and non- citizens alike. i have been attempting to speak publicly about the very low number of civilian casualties that result from such strikes. but for the past several years, this committee has done significant oversight of the government's knowledge of targeted strikes, and the figures we have obtained from the executive branch, which we have done have confirmed that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. when i asked to give out the actual numbers, i am told you cannot, and i say why not? because it is classified. it is a covert program. for the public, it does not exist. well, i think that rationale, mr. brennan, is long gone, and i will talk to you about that because i think it is very important that we share this data with people. this committee will continue to perform significant oversight of targeted strikes. we received this morning and office of legal counsel opinion on the topic. actually, we received a short one and a long o
concern and u.s. officials were hard at work around the globe trying to prevent regional tensions and animosity from turning into full-scale wars and ominously, the united states was about to face an upsurge in terrorist attacks that would claim hundreds of american drives in lebanon including a 49-year-old cia officers named bob ames, killed during a brief visit to our embassy in beirut and who at the time was my boss at the cia. during my 25 year career at cia i watched up close and participated in history being made in far off corners of the world and cia fulfilled its critical intelligence role collecting intelligence, uncovering secrets, identifying threats, partnering with foreign intelligence and security services, analyzing complicated developments abroad and carrying out covert action and attempting to forecast events yet to happen, all in an effort to protect our people and to strengthen america's national security. and throughout my career, i had the great fortune to experience firsthand as well as to witness what it means to be a cia officer. such as an analyst who had
and detained with the u.s. support. >> i submit that the answer to that is one. he was put on a u.s. ship&interrogated for 30 days. thank you. >> thank you, mr. violence chairman. i want to point out that i'm going to try to enforce the eight minute. if you hear a tapping, it's not personal. senator rockefeller? >> thank you, madam chair, welcome mr. brennan, and if confirmed, you're going to lead an extraordinary agency with extraordinary people who perform extraordinary services, most of them totally unknown by the american people. most don't think about that. a life of public service and never having been known. those citizens with everything that we do to be known, and we get elected. it's very different in the central intelligence association and i respect it very much. i want to go to the eitc, that's tax credit, to the enhanced interrogation techniques. not the for the first. you talk about the 6,000 pages. what i want to say, an when the seconsecond round round comes, i will. dealing with the frustration of various administration, about trying to get information. why was it that t
crumbling of the soviet union. weapons of mass destruction were a concern and u.s. officials were hard at work around the globe trying to prevent regional tensions and an mos if is from turning in to full-scale wars and ominously, the united states about to face an upsurge in terrorist attacks to claim hundreds of american lives in lebanon including a 49-year-old cia officer named bob ames killed in a brief visit to our embassy in beirut and who at the time was my boss at cia. during my 25-year career at cia, i watched up close and participated in history being made in far off corners of the world. as cia fulfilled the critical intelligence roles, collecting intelligence, uncovering secrets, identifying threats, partnering with foreign intelligence and security agencies, carrying out covert action and attempting to forecast events yet to happen, all in an effort to protect our people and to strengthen america's national security. and throughout my career, i had the great fortune to experience firsthand and to witness what it means to be a cia officer. such as an analyst, who has t
despite the substantial progress made against them still seek to carry out deadly strikes strikes. u.s. computer networks are under daily attack by nation states. international criminal organizations, sub national groups and individual hackers. and regimes in teheran and po pyongyang remain bent on delivery systems rather than fulfilling international obligations or even meeting the basic needs of their people. yes, the cia's mission as important to our nation's security today as any time in our nation's history. in carrying out the mission, the men and women of the cia frequently asked to undertake challenging, perilous and, yes, controversial actions on behalf of the american people. the cia is not immune from the scrutiny of the efforts and i welcome a discussion of cia's past and current activities. if i am confirmed one of the highest priorities would be the committ committee's lengthy report of interrogation with now banned interrogation techniques. i have read the findings and executive summary of the 6,000 page report which raises a number of very serious issues. given the grav
of targeted force for over a year, including the circumstances in which such force is directed against u.s. citizens and non-citizens alike. i have been attempting to speak publicly about the very low number of civilian casualties that result from such strikes. . but for the past several years, this committee has done significant oversight of the government's, but of targeted strikes and the figures we have obtained from the executive branch, which we have done have confirmed that the number of civilian casualties that have resulted from such strikes each year has typically been in the single digits. when i asked to give out the actual numbers, i am told you cannot, and i say why not? because it is classified. it is a covert program. for the public, it does not exist. well, i think that rationale, mr. brennan, is long gone, and i will talk to you about that because i think it is very important that we share this data with people. this committee will continue to perform significant oversight of targeted strikes. we received this morning and office of legal counsel opinion on the topic. actu
church in the u.s. and in ireland and other countries? tonight i will tell you what i think. i know who the front runner is right now and what we can expect of him. and let's face it, the election of a pope is a political as well as a spiritual undertaking. ambition and humility both play their roles. the stakes, who will lead the church for the years ahead, probably for our lifetimes. it's going to matter and not just to catholics. i'm joined by melinda henneberger and e.j. dionne. here is my pick, cardinal angelo scola, just barely young enough to make it. the biggest thing he has going in his favor, the pope wants him, and there are a lot of voting cardinals who owe the pope. a majority were picked by the fellow right there, his holiness. about 56%, close to the two-thirds needing to win. he's italian, that always helps. he's european. 62, a majority are from europe. you know how political i'm getting here? i'm just starting here, melinda. this is a political enterprise. it's a secular event, and it's an election, very democratic. my bet is that this pope wants a quick election becau
this document to be filed in the u.s. attorney in washington d.c. and it has to do with the allegation over misuse of campaign funds. the investigation also takes in his wife sandy in chicago who served as his campaign manager. >> lynn sweet, thank you very much. much more coming up. also, we'll hear from the president in chicago. i'm brooke baldwin. listen to jim acosta in for wolf in washington. hey, jim. >>> thanks, brooke. happening now, look up in the sky. a fireball and a shocking reminder that planet earth is spinning around in a very unpredictable neighborhood. back on dry land and already heading to court, we have details of the first lawsuit filed by a passenger who says the cruise line's negligence turned their vacation into a nightmare. >>> and the "blade runner" goes to court and cries uncontrollably. wolf blitzer is off today. i'm jim acosta. you're in the situation room. we are starting in chicago where right now president obama's about to take the stage to talk about two of the top priorities from his state of the union speech, jobs and guns. we expect him to connect the nee
stewart is not surprised, take a look. >> the u.s. postal service says delivering the mail on saturdays must stop if they are to survive. >> the postal service hopes the cuts will help it save some $2 billion annually after losing nearly $16 billion last year. >> wow. i can't believe the business model of transporting letters with vehicles across the country for 40 cents a pop is failing. so where do you want me to take that, hawaii? no, no trouble, i'll put out a plane and get it there in two days. you got a quarter? yeah i'll do it for a quarter. yeah, [ bleep ] it, i'll just do it. >>> everybody's excited for the snow. poor bill has to work all day tomorrow. his son william's birthday. >> maybe you can replace me, go to his birthday party for me. >> i'll be happy to do that. how many inches in new york? >> i'm going for 6 to 8, weather service is going for 12. >> bundle up. still ahead, texts and e-mails are next. "morning joe" is now just moments away. officemax is celebrating our new collaboration with go daddy! with an online package including: domain name, website bu
as a community organizer. he would become a state legislator and u.s. senator. the connection is great. he still has a home here. the 15-year-old hadiya pendleton was killed a mile from where his job is. the connection is very real for him. the gun violence rate is one of the highest in the country. the poverty rate in the south side of chicago where he will be speaking today, where he was once a community organizer, one of the highest in the country. we've been here a couple of days, talking to community organizers. they say the need has never been greater. so when the president comes here, politically the main thing is to give his message from the state of the union and put it on the ground where the people are and where the situations require it and, of course, south side of chicago is a place where urban violence is very much a foot. however, there's going to be the looming question, are you just giving your speech or are you going to make good on the promises here where you call home? a lot of people are so happy to see the president but they will be even more happy if these words turn into
and center. waterboarding, however you define it, is no longer front and center because the u.s. has discontinued doing it. we talk about "zero dark thirty." >> 400 drone strikes. do we know, any idea, about civilian casualties within those? any concept? collateral damage? >> it wasn't the best part of mr. brennan's testimony yesterday, there has been significant collateral damage. the numbers are obviously -- whether it's hundreds or thousands -- the real question is, you've got to ask yourself on a cost benefit way, yes. at times innocents are going to be hurt. you've got to ask yourself don rumsfeld's questions. what you are accomplishing against terrorists, is that to some extent offset by the fact that you're alienating populations and governments with whom you have to work? that's the question we have to constantly ask ourselves, this cost benefits test. >> john, it's donny. if we got to the point and as i listen to mr. brennan, where we were going to do a drone strike against an american citizen, it would be the most desperate of times, and i don't want to have to go through a
bin laden from the u.s. navy s.e.a.l. who took him out. i'm wolf blitzer. you're in "the situation room." -- captions by vitac -- www.vitac.com >>> all that coming up, but there's also developments happening right now in southern california. frayed nerves and a cold trail, as investigators search for the fired los angeles police officer christopher dorner who's declared war on the police, now wanted in the murders of three people. we're standing by for a news conference. the prosecutor is going to be giving us new information. let's check in with cnn's miguel marquez in los angeles for an update. do police have any serious clues right now? >> reporter: it's not for lack of trying. they are trying to create those clues. they say they have 600 clues that hundreds of investigators are trying to pile through. right now, people are very nervous across the entire state. nervous students return. schools finally reopened in big bear. >> there's a bad guy on the loose and we don't want to get shot by him. >> reporter: today, it's security, along with students. >> today we feel much better.
. i went to the german embassy in 2007. the ambassador had all of the ambassadors to the u.s. i said let's talk about detention and interrogation. i laid it out. let me give you four sentences. we believe we are a nation at war with al qaeda and the affiliates. my moral and legal responsibility is to take it to that enemy. there's not another country in the room who agreed with any of those four sentences. they not only rejected it for them, they had serious questions about the legitimacy of the questions for us. sometimes you have to forgo things that in your mind are ethical, legal, and effective because secondary and tertiary effects of taking that course of action may make you less effective. let's take target of killing. i said on cnn sunday morning, there was a time -- i knew there were secondary effects was the primary effect was so important because of the degree of danger that existed at the time. now the environment as changed the degree is somewhat different. now those effects might become dominant. yes, i can see a down side for doing things that you believe are effective
on rules in the u.s. and its. there were four democrats, for republicans. it was a diverse group of senators including senator mccain, senator kyl, senator pryor, senator schumer. it was a group -- senator levin was our leader on the democratic side. we came up with reforms that i think will help. the cannot filibuster bringing a bill to the board. rather now where the minority cannot vote against cloture because they are doing it on a procedural basis. the bill will now be before us. it will get started in debate and voting on amendments before we have to worry about whether we need 60 votes for the threshold. secondly, there is a limit on how you can filibuster. we can bring the president's judicial nominees up in a much quicker way. there, you have eliminated two of the potentials on going to conference. getting into conference is particularly important in going to this congress. the most significant reform, we have dramatically reduced the power of an individual senator. if you are going to object, you need to do it on the floor of the u.s. senate. you can no longer be in you
, abdel al rahman, or zacarias moussaoui. they were all convicted in u.s. courts and are currently in prison at federal maximum security facilities across the country. we as a country have experience prosecuting, convicting, and housing for life very dangerous people, including international terrorism suspects. that's why thompson, illinois, had competition when they said they want these guys. that's why thompson, illinois, had to compete with places like hardin, montana, and standish, michigan when they decided to seek the relatively lucrative labor intensive business of locking these guys up in their maximum security prison. and that's why the city of new york initially greeted the news of khalid sheikh mohammed's forthcoming trial at the scene of his crime as not just justice, but poetic justice. and then we lost our nerve. what happened? the politics of the past administration or something decided to come back. new york officials who initially responded to the khalid sheikh mohammed announcement day saying yes, let's do it. it's fitting that he face trial here where he killed s
Search Results 0 to 31 of about 32 (some duplicates have been removed)